click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20121001
20121031
STATION
SFGTV 7
LINKTV 5
CSPAN 3
CSPAN2 2
CNN 1
CNNW 1
LANGUAGE
English 19
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >>> okay, thank you. >> we next have zachary marks and then susanna russo. >>> hello, supervisors. thank you for having me here today for this appointment hearing. let me introduce myself real quickly. my name is zach marks, i'm aes are department of san francisco. i used to work in washington, d.c. for senator ted kennedy and i recently got my masters at the university of san francisco in politics and public affairs, interned here for the mayor's office for the legislative director jason elliott and right now i'm working downstairs for the department of elections in a temporary position. i'm also serving on the pedestrian safety committee which i came before you guys and spoke. and used to serve as the west coast director for the environmental health trust and now as the director of the california brain tumor association. i definitely have a strong interest in animal matters. i have always had a dog my entire life, a golden retriever and i have him as a service animal through the san francisco spca. and he does go ahead and visit people in hospitals on brain tumor patients. so, that's s
first, and then susanna, and then we'll take you. >> he spoke about reincarnation and actually rising from the dead. as a religious studies professor, could you speak a little more on that, like from- because i don't know. i don't know. that's always been a key question of mine is where does heaven come in, in some of these religions, and is it a concern, is it not a concern; sometimes it is, sometimes it's not? >> well, yeah, yeah. see, i think the point he's trying to make and the juxtaposition is it's his turnaround on eastern religion- you know, that's his put-down. he says that if you got a reincarnation, you've got no physical death and resurrection- that's what he's saying. so he's saying you can't have one or the other, because that's everything in his mind- you can't have one or the other; you know, you've got to have one thing. you can't, you know, cross boundaries, because that's the mind set. so what he's saying there is that if you're going to be reincarnating, then the physical death of the body doesn't count. i mean, reincarnation would completely, in his mind, undercut
away, and then susanna. >> as an african-american in today's society, what is the refocusing of your goal, the social goal of you, and how does that differ from the nation of islam, or are they together, and could you speak a little bit about that? >> yes. well, i agree with dr. salam, that they are now different worlds. i don't believe that we- i know the old structure of racism is gone, but there are still individuals who live- think the way they think and live the way they live, and have their opinions. and we still get together with each other, and we live differently, and we are different, and that's what many of us perhaps don't want to admit- we are different. we're humanly the same in human identity, but when it comes to our sensitivities, our emotions, etc., we have the sensitivities and the emotions and the mentality and thinking of our people more than any other people, and that's for every people- for every people. so we are different, and we do kind of live in different worlds. and as far as the perception of reality, i think african-americans and most people in modern c
for seat number 2, the reappointment of susanna russo who is currently on the body. my feeling is that as a general rule, you want some continuity and if someone's done a good job, i think it makes sense to continue with that individual. so, i would make the motion -- my suggestion would be i guess maybe we can talk about the other seat, but with respects to seat 7 and 2, that's what i would suggest. >> thank you. so, we do have a motion to move forward susanna russo for seat 2 and dr. shari o'neill for seat 7 and leaving open discussion on, again, for seat 1. and i'm more than happy to support those two applicants as well. ms. russo, i do appreciate the time you spent on this commission and i think it's also important to have some continuation of folks that have been working on this issue and clearly know a lot about the welfare of animals here in our city. and dr. o'neill was very impressed with you, your application, and many letters of recommendation that came on your expertise on this issue. and realizing the importance of having a veterinarian on this commission, i'm happ
of healthful home medicine that goes along these lines. let me just give you one example. no, susanna, go ahead, and then i'll give you my example. >> i've had a couple of experiences too. my first job out in kent state speech path was i was one of three who was invited to initiate a program of speech and language therapy services in the schools of tuscarawas county, ohio, and we had to divide the county up. some folks were making wise remarks about the amish, and i said, "i would take that section," because it sounded interesting, and i thought i would like it. then i found out that school district hadn't had a catholic within 500 yards for many years, so they had to take a vote about whether it was okay. whether that's true or not, i don't know, but i can tell you that i had a wonderful welcome and three extremely happy years there. but i learned about the amish, and i consider them a great people. there were two one - room amish schoolhouses on my beat, along with a couple of high schools that were not amish and a set of grade schools that were not amish. most of the amish children were in t
be hard to put in a book. >> susanna? >> i wonder if what we're talking about as magic, too, might also be expressed as like being in grace? >> oh, yes. >> in a state of grace. >> oh, yes. >> it seems to me that's what grace has always meant - you're connected. >> we sometimes call it in trance - in trance. >> well, grace - i think we experience that in the catholic tradition, that's what they were called. >> we do work with the - some holidays - >> yeah, that might be interesting to get some background on. >> wheel of the year is simply the relationship - actually, if you want to step into mythology - my belief is it is the love story of the earth and the sun. and so when we have a wheel of the agricultural year, it begins with that verb, and conception at winter solstice, and the quickening of life at the midyear in february, and then the birth of everything that has the courage to sprout with the spring equinox, to come into its fullness in may, to reach its pinnacle right now at summer solstice. and then, as all living things do, begin to offer itself back to life, with our celebrat
here with us today in susanna martinez. i am so thrilled to have susanna with us. [applause] governor martinez understands what a tough race is. she understands what a tough race is, how tough it is in nevada to move this same agenda forward. i know what a tough race is, she knows what a tough races, governor romneya tough race is. to have everybody coming together like this. making the necessary changes in mexico, moving in mexico ford will move america forward. -- mexico -- new mexico forward will move america forward. >> his thank you. elcome. mpa we will not take a defeat, we will win this election. that last debate to between the president and mitt romney, what an amazing difference. when you do not have a record to run on, you do not have a whole lot to say. that is what is in play. government -- governor romney had a record, he was strong, he was successful as governor, how he turned to stay around. 87% of his legislators were democrats, and he was still successful. he cut taxes 19 times. he was at the top of education for kids in his state. we know he has a record that he can
evan thomas. followed by british prime minister david cameron. later, new mexico governor susanna martinez campaigns for mitch romney in nevada. -- mitt romney in nevada. >> this week, evan thomas discusses his narrative, "ike's bluff." >> evan thomas, author of "ike's bluff." discussion throughout the entire book, ike's health. why? >> he had a stroke. he had a stomach operation. he was old. he was at the time the oldest president ever. he smoked four packs a day up until 1949. his health was not great. he was a robust man, but an old man with serious health issues. they got to him. >> dr. snyder. >> he was his personal doctor. he seemed to be at the white house 24-7. he kept a diary. they feared if ike got to tents and to worry, he would have another heart attack. he said, mr. president, you have to relax. he would say, what you think this job is? of course he was worried. that was a constant theme. >> who was howard snyder? >> he was his personal doctor, older, an army surgeon. it was happenstance he became a doctor. he was not properly trained. he misdiagnosed ike's heart atta
's a bit frightening. yeah, susanna? >> yeah, but in that whole situation there, you would have needed a secret ballot, too, from what they say, and that's not very likely to happen. and you have to have people who are capable of voting - of making up their own minds. and you were making a little joke about the lawyers earlier - they would have been the last group to fall for thing in the absence of concrete - of solid evidence. but they, apparently, weren't even free to lead - they didn't feel like they could lead a revolution because of the let's say learned helplessness of the people with them in this jungle with nothing, as far as they knew, that you could get to from there. and so learned helplessness and resignation to. i think it's hard to imagine, though, people going in with high ideals and being able to rationalize to themselves the okayness of a suicideness loyalty test, which anytime could have been the final thing - that's some kind of criteria. and he was talking christ-like, but that's not where it was. >> you're right. and to see that go downhill, we'll talk more about
was the governor, susanna martinez, who serves as the honorary co-chair of the mitt romney's outreach committee. from summerlin, nevada, this is about 10 minutes. >> this is a gentleman who took me under his wing. he really did. this is someone i call a real trusted friend. when the republicans take the majority of the united states senate, this gentleman will be the chairman of the finance committee. what a difference. what a difference that will make for america. let me introduce you to orrin hatch. >> kamal. thank you so much. we are going to support him, we are supporting him. get out and really tell everybody to vote for dean heller. we also need joe and danny. they are really good candidates. when did you think of that romney debate? [applause] [applause]
is a little thin right now. susanna martinez, if you buy this idea that you can elect mark governor says president that we do members of congress. i think barbara lee is right. i think that is for the pipeline is likely to come from. she's articulate. she's only been in office a couple of years. every six years depending how she's groomed. i think she is the potential. elizabeth warren kind of depends on what happens in a few weeks with her. and she selected, i think she's some unutterable lookout. we just need to get more women elected. we only have 17% of congress as women right now at research has been done at the center occurred several years ago soberly to make any kind of the difference. ted todd about changing the culture is coming with the composition of congress, more women sharing important committees. one of the unfortunate things is because bow out of the women we profiled in this book who are still in congress like olympia snowe had the same problem diane feinstein has, but on the republican side. so a lot of the women are giving up or don't really see themselves as being ab
offices, all of them republican. republican governors. susanna martinez, brian sandoval. so you're seeing hispanic voters, hispanic politicians, while democrats tend to win the majority of them, are doing very well in the republican party. >> when you look at the latino voting block there are more than 11 million eligible latinos who aren't even registered to vote. many of them are young voters. why so many? why aren't they getting out to the polls? >> well, it's interesting, randi, because that's clearly something that the democrats have been focused on to make sure that we get as many latino voters out there, especially those that are eligible to get registered and then to vote. i think the problem is that a lot of them are very concerned with their own livelihoods. they have been really beat down by the recession that was caused by the republican policies in george w. bush's tenure, and, you know, a lot of them are holding down -- trying to hold down more than one job, some more than two jobs. so i really think it's incumbent upon the parties to really reach out to them to let them kno
candidate. i think you can say the same thing for susanna martinez who is also a star within the republican party with brian sandoval and some of the congressional folks that were elected like raul -- who would have ever thought there could've been a mormon puerto rican elected out of idaho of all places? it's not because he ran -- obviously that is not a hispanic district. he is not a niche has been out or latino candidate. he is a mainstream republican candidate. we have given them the freedom to be able to do that and we have been able to develop stars and can use that as a platform. i think that is very encouraging and i don't agree with all of the policies but i see it as something that is healthy and wholesome to our democratic system. >> can i just add to the flipside of that? and i do think it's great we do have more latinos running, but ironically these are not latino candidate who have gotten a majority of support. >> sometimes they are not even in latino districts. >> well but let's talk about new mexico and talk about nevada. those are huge latino populations and their governors
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)